texas

Texas Research Should Help With HLB

Dan Citrus, Research

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists have made a discovery that should help combat fastidious or “unculturable” pathogens, such as Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the HLB causal agent. HLB is also known as citrus greening disease. Kranthi Mandadi, a researcher with Texas A&M, and his colleagues have been working several years on developing new technologies to fight the fastidious pathogens. Mandadi and his team …

hlb research

UF/IFAS Collaborates on HLB Research

Dan Citrus, Research

Several University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) faculty are collaborating with other universities and organizations on research, especially for HLB. Michael Rogers, director of the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center (CREC), summarizes the work they are doing on a variety of grant-funded projects. Rogers starts with a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded project led by the University …

label

Label Doesn’t Impact Beverage Choices

Dan Citrus, Research

This year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration updated the nutrition facts label to highlight certain information, including added sugars, to help consumers make healthier food choices. A University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) study found that the label did not impact consumer beverage choices. “We were interested in how effective the newly updated nutrition label …

study

Study Shows OJ Benefits for Children

Dan Citrus, Research

A new study finds that children who drink 100 percent orange juice (OJ) as part of a healthy diet have better overall diet quality and consume more nutrients than those who do not. The research also adds to a growing body of evidence showing consumption of 100 percent OJ has no impact on weight in children. Authors of the study …

university

University of Florida Citrus Faculty Highly Sought After as Research Partners in Fight Against Greening

Dan Citrus, Florida, Industry News Release, Research

(UF/IFAS) — University of Florida citrus researchers continue to be sought out as partners in ground-breaking research projects to fight Huanglongbing, also known as citrus greening disease.  The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), recently awarded nearly $4.5 million in grants to UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty to find novel ways to fight the disease. But UF/IFAS researchers are serving leadership roles in four other multi-million-dollar grants awarded to colleague …

pruning

Pruning Principles for High-Quality Citrus

Dan Citrus, Research

Planting citrus varieties for fresh market production has increased in popularity. With these potentially high-value crops come concerns about management practices, including pruning. Recently, Fernando Alferez informed growers in a virtual presentation about manual pruning principles. Alferez is a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences citrus horticulturist at the Southwest Florida Research and Education Center. According to Alferez, pruning …

Joint Culturing Project for HLB?

Dan Citrus, Research

Four researchers from around the country summarized their work on culturing the causal agent of HLB and agreed to consider a large, joint culturing project. The Citrus Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) hosted the panel discussion on Nov. 5 about culturing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CRDF organized the presentation after receiving a request for funding of a CLas culturing project from Washington State University researcher …

genome

Genome Sequencing and Other UF Research

Dan Citrus, Research

Michael Rogers discusses the importance of the recent sequencing of the trifoliate orange genome by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) researchers and others. He also tells how growers can learn more about UF/IFAS research ….. Read more about the Genome Sequencing and Other UF Research on the Citrus Industry website.